Monthly Archives: February 2014

Hi Vaibhav Agrawal, welcome to the Mozilla Community!

I have had the pleasure to work with Vaibhav for the last 6 weeks as he has joined the Mozilla community as a contributor on the A-Team.  As I have watched him grow in his skills and confidence, I thought it would be useful to introduce him and share a bit more about him.

From Vaibhav:

What is your background?

I currently reside in Pilani, a town in Rajasthan, India. The thing that I like the most about where I live is the campus life. I am surrounded by some awesome and brilliant people, and everyday I learn something new and interesting.

I am a third year student pursuing Electronics and Instrumentation at BITS Pilani. I have always loved and been involved in coding and hacking stuff. My favourite subjects so far have been Computer Programming and Data Structures and Algorithms. These courses have made my basics strong and I find the classes very interesting.

I like to code and hack stuff, and I am an open source enthusiast. Also, I enjoy solving algorithmic problems in my free time. I like following new startups and the technology they are working on, running, playing table tennis, and I am a cricket follower.

How did you get involved with Mozilla?

I have been using Mozilla Firefox for many years now. I have recently started contributing to the Mozilla community when a friend of mine encouraged me to do so. I had no idea how the open source community worked and I had the notion that people generally do not have time to answer silly questions and doubts of newcomers. But guess what? I was totally wrong. The contributors in Mozilla are really very helpful and are ready to answer every trivial question that a newbie faces.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

I see myself as a software developer solving big problems, building great products and traveling different places!

What advice would you give someone?

Do what you believe in and have the courage to follow your heart and instincts. They somehow know what you truly want to become.

In January :vaibhav1994 popped into IRC and wanted to contribute to a bug that I was a mentor on.  This was talos bug 931337, from that first bug Vaibhav has fixed many bugs including work on finalizing our work to support manifests in mochitest.  He wrote a great little script to generate patches for bugs 971132 and 970725.

Say hi in IRC and keep an eye out for bugs related to automation where he is uploading patches and fixing many outstanding issues!

 

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tracking talos alerts across branches

A year without blogging and I am back.  I figured there was some cool stuff to share, here is one tidbit.

In the last year I have picked up looking at talos results and filing regression bugs for results.  This has been useful.  What currently happens is when results are submitted to g.m.o (graph server) we detect a regression and send out an email to the original patch author (if we can determine it) and post to mozilla.dev.tree-management.  I have been using dev.tree-management as a starting point for my hunting regressions.  When things are busy it can eat up a couple hours in a day.  Luckily many developers are responsible in taking action when they receive the emails.

Given that at least half of the regressions are not acted upon by the original developer, it is important to read the newsgroup. One of the things which makes it frustrating is that for a single regression we can get multiple alerts (regular builds vs pgo builds and as the patch merges between branches/projects).

To make my life easier, I have taken all the alerts on dev.tree-management and put them in a database (local right now).  The final goal is a webUI that lets me easily annotate these alerts similar to tbpl for random test failures.  One thing I wanted to do was help identify duplicate alerts.  Today in my attempt I had a clear picture of what the lifecycle of a regression looks like:

mysql> select date,branch,percent,keyrevision from alerts where test=’Paint’ and platform=’WINNT 6.2 x64′ order by date ASC;
+———————+————————-+———+————–+
| date                | branch                  | percent | keyrevision  |
+———————+————————-+———+————–+
| 2014-02-14 19:41:38 | Mozilla-Inbound-Non-PGO | 10.1%   | c7802c9d6eec |
| 2014-02-15 01:03:54 | Fx-Team-Non-PGO         | 9.53%   | 7a3adc5aac28 |
| 2014-02-15 21:43:48 | Mozilla-Inbound         | 10.6%   | c7802c9d6eec |
| 2014-02-16 03:46:12 | Firefox-Non-PGO         | 8.88%   | 5d7caa093f4f |
| 2014-02-16 03:46:13 | B2g-Inbound-Non-PGO     | 9.44%   | 071885f79841 |
| 2014-02-16 14:22:38 | Fx-Team                 | 10.4%   | 7a3adc5aac28 |
| 2014-02-17 04:42:57 | B2g-Inbound             | 10.7%   | 071885f79841 |
| 2014-02-18 11:43:54 | Firefox                 | 9.76%   | eac89fb04bb9 |
+———————+————————-+———+————–+
8 rows in set (0.00 sec)

This is really cool to see how 1 change can generate alerts for 4 days.

Stay tuned for more information on this and other topics!

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